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donosor00

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About donosor00

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  1. Even using sudo fails: pi@raspbmc:~$ sudo echo 3 > /proc/sys/vm/drop_caches -bash: /proc/sys/vm/drop_caches: Permission denied You must be root: pi@raspbmc:~$ sudo -i root@raspbmc:~# echo 3 > /proc/sys/vm/drop_caches root@raspbmc:~# Good tip anycase
  2. Even using sudo fails: pi@raspbmc:~$ sudo echo 3 > /proc/sys/vm/drop_caches -bash: /proc/sys/vm/drop_caches: Permission denied You must be root: pi@raspbmc:~$ sudo -i root@raspbmc:~# echo 3 > /proc/sys/vm/drop_caches root@raspbmc:~# Good tip anycase
  3. Login using ssh, a public key and a password related to that file is a more secure way to do it than just using a password. I'll show you a not so secure way to login to you pi but more secure than a password. We'll use a passwordless private/public key. I'll refer to your computer to refer to the computer where you'll connect from and to pi to the little rapsberry pi. Let's go. We must create a private/public key pair if we don't already have one. On green what you must enter: $ ssh-keygen -t rsa Generating public/private rsa key pair. Enter file in which to save the key (/home/donosor00/.ssh/id_rsa): [press ENTER] Created directory '/home/donosor00/.ssh'. Enter passphrase (empty for no passphrase): [press ENTER*] Enter same passphrase again: [press ENTER*] Your identification has been saved in /home/donosor00/.ssh/id_rsa. Your public key has been saved in /home/donosor00/.ssh/id_rsa.pub. The key fingerprint is: f8:5f:d7:b2:bb:a9:25:5f:51:0f:e8:64:c3:8e:ad:3e donosor00@weee The key's randomart image is: +--[ RSA 2048]----+ | | | . . | | * . .| | . B . .o| | . S . + ..| | . . ..| | . . o + o| | oE. = = | | o...*o | +-----------------+ ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------ Where is [press ENTER*] you shoud enter a password if you want that additional protection but we are here for easeness. Now we have to copy our public key to the pi. There are two ways : the easy one, just typing: ssh-copy-id pi@192.168.1.254 <-- here the IP of your pi the old one. ssh-copy-id doesn't exist and we must copy it the hard way: host $ scp .ssh/id_rsa.pub pi@[ip of the raspberry]: Password: host $ ssh pi@[ip of the raspberry] Password: pi $ if [ ! -d .ssh ] ; then > mkdir .ssh > chmod 700 .ssh >fi pi $ cat id_rsa.pub >> .ssh/authorized_keys pi $ rm id_rsa.pub If you like the tutorial, please rate it. If you have any doubt, just ask. Enjoy
  4. Login using a public key for ssh (without password) from GNU/Linux Login using ssh, a public key and a password related to that file is a more secure way to do it than just using a password. I'll show you a not so secure way to login to you pi but more secure than a password. We'll use a passwordless private/public key. I'll refer to your computer to refer to the computer where you'll connect from and to pi to the little rapsberry pi. Let's go. We must create a private/public key pair if we don't already have one. On green what you must enter: $ ssh-keygen -t rsa Generating public/private rsa key pair. Enter file in which to save the key (/home/donosor00/.ssh/id_rsa): [press ENTER] Created directory '/home/donosor00/.ssh'. Enter passphrase (empty for no passphrase): [press ENTER*] Enter same passphrase again: [press ENTER*] Your identification has been saved in /home/donosor00/.ssh/id_rsa. Your public key has been saved in /home/donosor00/.ssh/id_rsa.pub. The key fingerprint is: f8:5f:d7:b2:bb:a9:25:5f:51:0f:e8:64:c3:8e:ad:3e donosor00@weee The key's randomart image is: +--[ RSA 2048]----+ | | | . . | | * . .| | . B . .o| | . S . + ..| | . . ..| | . . o + o| | oE. = = | | o...*o | +-----------------+ ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------ Where is [press ENTER*] you shoud enter a password if you want that additional protection but we are here for easeness. Now we have to copy our public key to the pi. There are two ways : the easy one, just typing: ssh-copy-id pi@192.168.1.254 <-- here the IP of your pi the old one. ssh-copy-id doesn't exist and we must copy it the hard way: host $ scp .ssh/id_rsa.pub pi@[ip of the raspberry]: Password: host $ ssh pi@[ip of the raspberry] Password: pi $ if [ ! -d .ssh ] ; then > mkdir .ssh > chmod 700 .ssh >fi pi $ cat id_rsa.pub >> .ssh/authorized_keys pi $ rm id_rsa.pub If you like the tutorial, please rate it. If you have any doubt, just ask. Enjoy Author donosor00 Category Raspberry Pi Tutorials / Guides / How-To's Submitted 02/13/2013 11:48 PM Updated 02/15/2013 07:53 PM
  5. 1.- Login to your raspberry 2.- Connect the pendrive 3.- See which device is used for it: PENDRIVE=$(echo '/dev/'$(dmesg | tail -1 | awk '{print $3}' | tr -d "[]")) 4.- Change the partition type (you must type in fdisk t 83 w): $ sudo fdisk $PENDRIVE Command (m for help): t Selected partition 1 Hex code (type L to list codes): 83 Command (m for help): w The partition table has been altered! 5.- Format the partition: mkfs.ext2 ${PENDRIVE}1 6.- Mount the pendrive as root or sudoing: sudo mount ${PENDRIVE}1 /mnt 7.- Copy the content of /home/pi to the pendrive (copy the line as is here as copying hidden files too is a little tricky): sudo cp -a /home/pi/. /mnt/ 8.- Unmount the pendrive: sync sudo umount /mnt 9.- Modify fstab (change '/dev/sda1' as needed): sudo -i echo "${PENDRIVE}1 /home/pi ext2 defaults,noatime 0 0" >> /etc/fstab sync 10.- Reboot Please, rate the tutorial if you like it or comment why if you don't. Thanks If you like it, please rate the tutorial.
  6. Using a pendrive automagically mounted at boot as your home directory 1.- Login to your raspberry 2.- Connect the pendrive 3.- See which device is used for it: PENDRIVE=$(echo '/dev/'$(dmesg | tail -1 | awk '{print $3}' | tr -d "[]")) 4.- Change the partition type (you must type in fdisk t 83 w): $ sudo fdisk $PENDRIVE Command (m for help): t Selected partition 1 Hex code (type L to list codes): 83 Command (m for help): w The partition table has been altered! 5.- Format the partition: mkfs.ext2 ${PENDRIVE}1 6.- Mount the pendrive as root or sudoing: sudo mount ${PENDRIVE}1 /mnt 7.- Copy the content of /home/pi to the pendrive (copy the line as is here as copying hidden files too is a little tricky): sudo cp -a /home/pi/. /mnt/ 8.- Unmount the pendrive: sync sudo umount /mnt 9.- Modify fstab (change '/dev/sda1' as needed): sudo -i echo "${PENDRIVE}1 /home/pi ext2 defaults,noatime 0 0" >> /etc/fstab sync 10.- Reboot Please, rate the tutorial if you like it or comment why if you don't. Thanks If you like it, please rate the tutorial. Author donosor00 Category Raspberry Pi Tutorials / Guides / How-To's Submitted 02/13/2013 11:15 PM Updated 02/15/2013 07:18 PM
  7. Hi. I recieved mine from RS. It took only two weeks!!! Ivan

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